Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid


reid_9781524798628_jkt_all_r1.inddDaisy Jones & The Six
by Taylor Jenkins Reid

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Blurb

Everyone knows Daisy Jones & The Six, but nobody knows the reason behind their split at the absolute height of their popularity . . . until now.

Daisy is a girl coming of age in L.A. in the late sixties, sneaking into clubs on the Sunset Strip, sleeping with rock stars, and dreaming of singing at the Whisky a Go Go. The sex and drugs are thrilling, but it’s the rock and roll she loves most. By the time she’s twenty, her voice is getting noticed, and she has the kind of heedless beauty that makes people do crazy things.

Also getting noticed is The Six, a band led by the brooding Billy Dunne. On the eve of their first tour, his girlfriend Camila finds out she’s pregnant, and with the pressure of impending fatherhood and fame, Billy goes a little wild on the road.

Daisy and Billy cross paths when a producer realizes that the key to supercharged success is to put the two together. What happens next will become the stuff of legend.

The making of that legend is chronicled in this riveting and unforgettable novel, written as an oral history of one of the biggest bands of the seventies. Taylor Jenkins Reid is a talented writer who takes her work to a new level with Daisy Jones & The Six, brilliantly capturing a place and time in an utterly distinctive voice.

 

Daisy Jones and the Six seems as if it has been absolutely everywhere, but I was very resistant to pick it up initially. I’m a fairly stubborn person so this happens to some degree with most books that get a lot of hype surrounding them (with Reese Witherspoon championing Daisy within her book club and optioning it for TV, it seems like this book has received more hype in the short time it has been published than almost any other this year).

The other reason I wasn’t sure I’d get on with this book is I’m not a huge music person. Given the choice to listen to music or sit in silence, I pick silence 99% of the time. I use music to block out other more annoying noise, but I’ve never been one to gush over albums and listen to music as a sole activity. Daisy Jones and the Six follows one of the best bands in the world as they tell the oral history of their rise and fall, so clearly there’s going to be a lot of music chat involved.

Eventually the temptation to give it a try got too much and I picked up a copy for myself, reasoning that I knew a lot of people whose cup of tea it definitely would be and I could pass it on to them once I was finished or if I really didn’t like.

In all honesty, it took me a while to get into the story. The book is written as an oral history in the form of interviews with the band and other individuals involved in the making and breaking of the group. This involves a lot of anecdotes overlapping and in most cases outright contradiction between characters telling the same story. My enjoyment of a book is very heavily reliant on connecting with characters and it took me a while to feel like I had a grip on the main players in this book. However, once I had dedicated some solid reading time to getting used to this unique style I thoroughly enjoyed it and came to find each characters way of telling the story familiar and amusing. I’m very keen to get my hands (or rather ears) on an audio book version as I think it would work incredibly well in this format- I’m also waiting for bated breath for news on the TV programme.

For what is on the face of it a simple plot (band gets together, band gets famous, band falls apart), Daisy Jones and the Six leaves you feeling like you’ve experienced something unique. At times I forgot I wasn’t reading a real biography of a band, I was so involved within the rawness, the sexuality, talent and angst of these characters and their hopelessly flawed self-destructive natures. I must have pulled up google several times wanting to search for a character to find an image of them, or to see the album artwork before remembering it didn’t actually exist.

There was still a lot of description of how they wrote songs and put their albums together which I knew wouldn’t be my cup of tea going into it, but my goodness the rest of the story was well worth those parts of the book.

Weeks later I’m still gathering my thoughts and feelings about this book, which is a real testament to the talent of Taylor Jenkins Reid. Having read ‘Daisy Jones and the Six’ I immediately went and bought another of her extremely hyped books to try and honestly, I don’t know how I ever lived without her writing in my life.

Don’t You Forget About Me, by Mhairi McFarlane


cover144744-medium.pngDon’t You Forget About Me
by Mhairi McFarlane

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

If there’s one thing worse than being fired from the grottiest restaurant in town, it’s coming home early to find your boyfriend in bed with someone else.

Reeling from the indignity of a double dumping on the same day, Georgina snatches at the next job that she’s offered – barmaid in a newly opened pub, which just so happens to run by the boy she fell in love with at school: Lucas McCarthy. And whereas Georgina (voted Most Likely to Succeed in her school yearbook) has done nothing but dead-end jobs in the last twelve years, Lucas has not only grown into a broodingly handsome man, but also has turned into an actual grown-up with a business and a dog along the way.

Meeting Lucas again not only throws Georgina’s rackety present into sharp relief, but also brings a dark secret from her past bubbling to the surface. Only she knows the truth about what happened on the last day of school, and why she’s allowed it to chase her all these years…

 

I received an e-ARC of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

I love a good rom-com in book form so I couldn’t wait to get stuck into Mhairi McFarlane’s latest book, ‘Don’t You Forget About Me’.

I find that one of McFarlane’s biggest strengths as a writer is creating characters who feel like your best mates and/or your worst enemies. With these sorts of novels (and in all books, but particularly within this genre for me) I find if you aren’t invested in the characters the story can drag- who cares about the plot if it revolves around someone who you couldn’t care less about! Thankfully, this story was full of people I either loved or completely detested and that made the reading experience really fun and just a bit infuriating at times.
Georgina is a gorgeous character and the fact she is surrounded by so many IDIOTS caused me to curse aloud at times. I found myself speed reading passages desperate to see how situations with her ex-boyfriend and stepfather would be resolved, wanting to reach into the book and give them a thump on the head on her behalf.
I was hooked on the plot from the first chapter (which is set 12 years in the past) desperate to understand what had happened and how it had impacted Georgina’s life since. The story unravels really well and explores really important topics such as grief, peer pressure and societal expectations. Most importantly I like that the story concentrates on Georgina needing to find happiness within herself, and her love story was additional to her personal development. She stays strong in the face of abhorrent treatment and extreme gas-lighting from her ex and her stepfather and fights back time and time again without giving in.
Amongst the serious topics within the book is a lot of humour, and the scenes between her and the McCarthy brothers in the pub she works in are some of my favourite in the book. Not to mention that fact that her blossoming connection with Lucas is ridiculously romantic and sexy.
Don’t You Forget About Me is a fantastic chick-lit novel. Hilariously funny, full of emotion and fantastically romantic, I loved Georgina from the first page to the last.

XX by Angela Chadwick

XX by Angela Chadwick

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I received an e-ARC of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

I was really intrigued when I read the synopsis for this book. Imagine a world in which scientists can use two women’s eggs to produce a baby girl. It’s such a interesting concept and one which would completely change the world if it were true.

From the beginning I was drawn into Jules and Rosie’s relationship and I felt a part of their struggles. Sometimes books which feature science as their plot are too science-heavy, whereas XX very much focuses on the humans involved in the science- what’s it like for them, what are they experiencing and feeling and how they would cope with the events that unfurl.

I found this meant I gobbled up page after page eager to know what happened next, personally invested in whether Rosie and Jules would get their happy ending. It also avoided the author getting anything too scientific incorrect, which is important as it wouldn’t have worked to make up the science involved in this process.

I had real problems liking Jules as a person. I felt she consistantly made the wrong choices when she could so easily have made the right one. She was quite infuriating as a character but this did work within the plot of the book as Jules frequently makes reference to the fact she knows she’s less personable and easy to like than her partner Rosie.

I thought the exploration of what makes a child yours and the feelings Jules and Rosie had about the baby all the way through the book was really believable and honestly whilst I was reading I had no idea how it was all going to end.

I also really enjoyed the fact it was set in Petersfield and surrounding areas as that’s near where I’m from. It was nice to see familiar names and areas being referenced. I think only people who live near Leigh Park will properly understand the relevance of Jules’s father being raised there!

I really enjoyed this book.

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Baby Boom! by Helen Wallen

Baby Boom! by Helen Wallen

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I recieved an e-ARC of this book via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

As the mother of an almost 14 month old toddler I am familiar with the mummy blogger tribes that fill instagram feeds with honest pictures, witty captions and links to hilarious blog posts. In fact, some of these bloggers helped me through some of the lonelier days of my year long maternity leave so when I saw that Helen Wallen of “Just a Normal Mummy” had turned her hand to fiction I couldn’t wait to get reading.

“Baby Boom!” is written in the same warm, inclusive, yet honest tone of the blog. It’s not a book interested in choosing sides when it comes to the best way of parenting, or even handling pregnancy and for that reason it was a refreshing read. Following three best friends in their late twenties/early thirties, two of whom become pregnant in very different situations, the book explores the highs and lows of pregnancy, relationships and motherhood.

For me, one of the nicest parts of this book was the friendship between Emily, Liz and Molly which was portrayed in the most natural and real way. Their Whatsapp conversations were hilarious to read and really made me feel as if I were a part of their friendship. Most strikingly though was the fact that at no point did the book become about them falling out. Before reading this book I didn’t realise how big a feature of women’s literature best friends having arguments is. Of course friends do argue, but in this instance it was just nice to have three women, in very different situations supporting each other in the best way they could above all else.

The only part of this book I didn’t love was the poetry at the beginning of each chapter which I find a bit twee. This type of poetry isn’t to my taste and I felt like they were a bit unneccesary to the book. However, I know a lot of “Just a Normal Mummy’s” followers enjoy her poetry within her blog so I understand why it has been included.

I wish I’d had this book to read on maternity leave, in that stretch of time before you have your first baby when you finish work and have nothing to do but wait for your baby to be born. That time when you only really want to be occupied by baby related things but also need to stop thinking about your impending labour before you go mad. It’s the perfect escapism and I will be buying a copy for any pregnant friends in future to enjoy.

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