The Last by Hanna Jameson

71WD9ECN1QL.jpgThe Last by Hanna Jameson

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Blurb:

Breaking: Nuclear weapon detonates over Washington

Breaking: London hit, thousands feared dead

Breaking: Munich and Scotland hit. World leaders call for calm

Historian Jon Keller is on a trip to Switzerland when the world ends. As the lights go out on civilization, he wishes he had a way of knowing whether his wife, Nadia and their two daughters are still alive. More than anything, Jon wishes he hadn’t ignored Nadia’s last message.

Twenty people remain in Jon’s hotel. Far from the nearest city and walled in by towering trees, they wait, they survive.

Then one day, the body of a young girl is found. It’s clear she has been murdered. Which means that someone in the hotel is a killer.

As paranoia descends, Jon decides to investigate. But how far is he willing to go in pursuit of justice? And what kind of justice can he hope for, when society as he knows it no longer exists?

I recieved an e-ARC of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

It took me a while to get into this book, partly because I was expecting a typical post-apocalyptic/dystopian story and this book has so much more to it. In order to set the plot up properly there is a lot of time devoted to introducing the characters and letting the reader know the dynamics between the inhabitants of the hotel.

I initially stuggled with the idea that this book was only told from one person’s point of view- Jon Keller an American Historian. I’m used to books like this having break-out short chapters which provide news about the outside world but in The Last, the reader is as cut-off as the guests trapped within the hotel. Once I got used to this lack of knowledge, I found myself falling headfirst into the book barely coming up for air.

The murder mystery plot worked incredibly well against the post-apocalytpic backdrop and left me feeling increasingly on-edge as Jon circled nearer and nearer to uncovering the truth.

Despite the sci-fi nature of the this book, I can’t say that reading it was particularly an escape from stresses of life. In fact, it was fairly uncomfortable at time how closely the book mirrored the political climate of the world currently. Every so often I had the stark realisation that this fictional catastrophy wasn’t actually that far-fetched of an idea, which was incredibly unnerving.

As far as the characters, I’m not sure that I actually liked any of them, but then again I’m not sure any of us would be the best version of ourselves at the end of the world. Still, I invested in their stories and even shed a few tears for them. I wanted them to find a way to start rebuilding their lives and living happily.

The conclusion of the book tied up the murder mystery plot well, which I was pleased about. As I neared the end of the story I was concerned we were running out of pages to resolve that plot and it would have been easy to leave it unresolved.

If post-apocalytic dystopian reads are your thing I would definitely recommend The Last. It has a feel of the Walking Dead about it, but the writing is much more accomplished and subtle. It is a scarily believable imagining of what might happen to civilisation if a nuclear war broke out on this scale.

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Distortion by Victor Dixen

Distortion by Victor Dixen

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I recieved an e-ARC of this book via Netgalley in return for an honest review

I really loved Ascension so I couldn’t wait to start reading Distortion. I was desperate to know what the Martian pioneers would decide to do!

Distortion opens straight back in the thick of the action that Ascension finished on, which I loved. All too often sequels finish on a really juicy story line and pick up miles in the future when everything has been resolved. In Distortion, we get to experience the pioneers making the decision whether to land on Mars or turn the Cupido around. The suspense was really well built and up until the decision was made I was unsure which they would choose to go with.

I found the story line with Andrew and Harmony a bit of a disruption to the flow of the book. I don’t massively care about their characters because they went from being secondary to a main story line in this book and really when I’m reading about them I just want to be back on Mars! However, I feel like they do play an important part in the ongoing plot and I’m interested to see what happens in the next book.

I really loved all of the action on Mars, in particular the storm and the revelation that the robots can talk really peaked my interest and made the book impossible to put down. I’m really enjoying this series and can’t wait to continue it and see whether they continue to live on Mars, return to Earth or suffer from the depressurisation of the habitats.

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Eve of Man by Giovanna Fletcher

Eve of Man by Giovanna Fletcher

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I recieved an e-ARC of this book via Netgalley in return for an honest review.

Individually I love both Tom and Giovanna’s writing. Giovanna’s warm, cozy romances always go straight to the top of my TBR list and as the mother of an 18 month old troublemaker I loved her non-fiction parenting book too. Tom meanwhile has until now stuck to children’s picture books and middle grade fiction and whilst I have enjoyed them, I’ll admit that I was interested to see how his writing style, which seemed so suited to younger audiences, would adapt to fit this new audience for him.

Eve of Man is set in a world where no girls have been born for 50 years. Then, Eve is born and she is protected and revered as the saviour of mankind. Kept in a tower, away from the rest of the world Eve’s whole life is mapped out for her but all Eve wants is freedom and the chance to make her own decisions about her future.

The plot appealed to me immediately. I love a post-apocalyptic dystopian story and although it’s a genre that became quite saturated a few years ago, I haven’t read any in a good few years so I was ready to get stuck in.

The story is told through the point of view of the two main characters Eve and Bram, with each author taking resposibility for writing one of the characters. I love the idea of this collaberative way of developing a story and I think it was really effective in making both Eve and Bram such well developed characters. Obviously both Tom and Gi had an overview of the story as a whole but as you read the book you can tell that they trusted their instincts and wrote each chapter as they felt their character would react and that meant I felt really personally invested in them as people.

A main part of the story centres around Eve being presented with suitors for her to select one with whom she would begin to repopulate the human race. The scenes that centre around Eve’s preparation for this are really uncomfortable but also so powerful. Internal examinations and frank discussions about what is expected of “the saviour of mankind” would of course be part and parcel of Eve’s life but I don’t think I’ve ever seen them featured in a book in this way.

There were lots of little touches in the book that weren’t particularly part of the main plot but which really added to the atmosphere of the story. One particular aspect I liked was the inclusion of a little pod that they travel the Thames in. Not until it docked in a “big wheel” did I realise it was a pod from the London Eye! I thought this was an ingenius little touch.

I really enjoyed this book and I can’t wait for the next installment in the trilogy.

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The Folded Man by Matt Hill

The Folded Man by Matt Hill

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

It’s 2018 and England is in a bad way. Manchester, to be specific, has run to ruin with riots having burned much of it to the ground and society ravaged almost to the point of being unrecognisable. The novel concentrates on the central character of Brian Meredith- drug addled, with a dysmorphic feature that leaves him wheelchair bound and depressed. He also thinks he’s a mermaid, and this is where The Folded Man gets confusing.

I loved Matt Hill’s writing. He has an easy confidence to his prose that makes it compelling to read and the character’s he has developed are wonderfully eccentric and English which lends a real sense of black humour to the novel, despite it being pretty close to home in turns of where our economy society appears to be leading us to currently.

However, for all that I loved the writing, at many points in the book I didn’t have a clue as to what was actually happening. At points I almost gave up and resigned myself to the fact I just wasn’t intelligent enough to keep up with the plot. I read on though, and I began to suspect that this sense of overwhelming puzzlement was down to the book being written from Brian’s point of view as it becomes abundantly clear that he doesn’t know what on earth is going on for much of the book!

Given the general sense of anarchy, panic and uncertainty of the book I didn’t mind not particularly knowing what was going on at all times. However, the absence of speech marks became a really big nuisance for me. On many pages I had to go over paragraphs I had just read to make sure that I knew who had said what. I see no reason for speech marks to ever be left out of books- they were invented for a reason and make the readers job a whole lot easier. The character’s, though artistically developed, did not have distinct enough voices for the reader to be able to instinctively know who was talking. Often, I’d be reading the page and wouldn’t realise that speech had begun until I was a couple of sentences into a conversation. This becomes tiresome after a while and did detract from my enjoyment when it was coupled with a general sense of having no idea what was going on.

I’m undecided as to whether I liked the ending or not. It’s difficult to discuss without spoiling, but it’s safe to say the novel took a turning that I did not expect. I can say that as a whole, my experience of reading The Folded Man was enjoyable. Putting this book down I felt like I’d just been on the biggest drug trip ever- which is probably exactly what Matt Hill wanted considering Brian’s constant and vast ingestion of substances. If you’re a fan of Orwell, Palahniuk, Bradbury or Huxley you should definitely give this book a go.

This review was first published on Nudge-books.com and Goodreads on 6th May 2013.

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