Eve of Man by Giovanna Fletcher

Eve of Man by Giovanna Fletcher

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I recieved an e-ARC of this book via Netgalley in return for an honest review.

Individually I love both Tom and Giovanna’s writing. Giovanna’s warm, cozy romances always go straight to the top of my TBR list and as the mother of an 18 month old troublemaker I loved her non-fiction parenting book too. Tom meanwhile has until now stuck to children’s picture books and middle grade fiction and whilst I have enjoyed them, I’ll admit that I was interested to see how his writing style, which seemed so suited to younger audiences, would adapt to fit this new audience for him.

Eve of Man is set in a world where no girls have been born for 50 years. Then, Eve is born and she is protected and revered as the saviour of mankind. Kept in a tower, away from the rest of the world Eve’s whole life is mapped out for her but all Eve wants is freedom and the chance to make her own decisions about her future.

The plot appealed to me immediately. I love a post-apocalyptic dystopian story and although it’s a genre that became quite saturated a few years ago, I haven’t read any in a good few years so I was ready to get stuck in.

The story is told through the point of view of the two main characters Eve and Bram, with each author taking resposibility for writing one of the characters. I love the idea of this collaberative way of developing a story and I think it was really effective in making both Eve and Bram such well developed characters. Obviously both Tom and Gi had an overview of the story as a whole but as you read the book you can tell that they trusted their instincts and wrote each chapter as they felt their character would react and that meant I felt really personally invested in them as people.

A main part of the story centres around Eve being presented with suitors for her to select one with whom she would begin to repopulate the human race. The scenes that centre around Eve’s preparation for this are really uncomfortable but also so powerful. Internal examinations and frank discussions about what is expected of “the saviour of mankind” would of course be part and parcel of Eve’s life but I don’t think I’ve ever seen them featured in a book in this way.

There were lots of little touches in the book that weren’t particularly part of the main plot but which really added to the atmosphere of the story. One particular aspect I liked was the inclusion of a little pod that they travel the Thames in. Not until it docked in a “big wheel” did I realise it was a pod from the London Eye! I thought this was an ingenius little touch.

I really enjoyed this book and I can’t wait for the next installment in the trilogy.

View all my reviews

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